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LOS ANGELES COLISUM

LOS ANGELES, CA

Site of the Olympic games in 1932 and 1984, the Los Angeles Coliseum has hosted many great games during its existence. Construction of a football stadium in the Los Angeles area began in the early 1920s. Completed in under three years, the first football game at the coliseum was on October 6, 1923.  The stadium has a large seating capacity, as nearly 76,000 bleachers circled the entire field. By 1930, the City of Los Angeles was awarded the 1932 Olympics. Over $950,000 was spent to enlarge the stadium to seat nearly 101,000 fans for the Olympics. Professional football at the Coliseum was first played in 1946, when owner of the Cleveland Rams, Dan Reeves moved his team to Los Angeles. The Rams became the first NFL team to move to the west coast. They played their first game at the coliseum on September 29, 1946 against the Philadelphia Eagles.

In April 1958, the Los Angeles Dodgers (MLB) temporarily moved to the coliseum while Dodger Stadium was being constructed. In 1959, a football game between USC and Ohio State was played at the coliseum. A hour after the game's completion, the first World Series game in California was also played. The Dodgers moved out of the coliseum after the 1961 season. However, the Los Angeles Rams spent more than three decades at the coliseum before moving to Anaheim Stadium after the 1979 season. The Rams played their final game at the Los Angeles Coliseum on December 16, 1979 against the New Orleans Saints. After the 1981 season, the Oakland Raiders moved to Los Angeles and the coliseum. They played their first game at the L.A. Coliseum on November 22, 1982. Two years later, the Coliseum hosted the 1984 Olympics.

After its expansion in the 1930s, the Los Angeles Coliseum underwent very few changes until the 1990s. In February 1993, a $15 million renovation project was completed at the coliseum. The bleachers were replaced with actual seats and fourteen rows of new seats were added, increasing the capacity to 92,000, after the field was lowered fourteen feet. A massive earthquake in 1994, required over $93 million in repairs to the coliseum. The Raiders decided to move back to the Oakland Coliseum after the 1994 season, playing their last game at the Los Angeles Coliseum on December 24, 1994. Today, the Los Angeles Coliseum continues to serve as the home of the University of Southern California football team.  It has been the home of two Super Bowls, Super Bowl I matching Green Bay Packers against the Kansas City Chiefs, and Super Bowl VII, matching the Miami Dolphins against the Washington Redskins.

FACTS & FIGURES
-Tenant: LA Raiders/Rams
-Capacity: 92,516
-Surface: Grass
-Opened: September 29, 1946 (NFL)
-Closed: December 24, 1994 (NFL)
-Other Names: None
-Cost:
$940,000
-Architect: Donald and John Parkinson
-Demolished: Current home of the USC Trojans (NCAA)
Super Bowl Tickets from OnlineSeats
SUPER BOWLS
SUPER BOWL I
Kansas City Chiefs vs Green Bay Packers
January 15, 1967
FINAL SCORE: Packers - 35, Chiefs - 10 MVP: Bart Starr
SUPER BOWL VII
Miami Dolphins vs Washington Redskins
January 14, 1973
FINAL SCORE: Dolphins - 14, Redskins - 7 MVP: Jim Plunkett
STADIUM SITE TODAY
 
LOS ANGEELS COLISEUM PICTURES
Coliseum in the late 1920's. Football at the coliseum in the 1950's. Baseball at the Coliseum. Aerial of the coliseum today. Outside the LA Coliseum
Click to Enlarge Pictures
PANORAMIC NFL STADIUM POSTERS
"Super Bowl XL" Pittsburgh Steelers 13.5"x39" Panoramic Poster
Super Bowl XL Panoramic Poster
"Super Bowl XXXIX" New England Patriots Panoramic Poster
Super Bowl XXXIX New England Patriots Panoramic Poster

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